CBD: A Picture of Worship (II Chron 5:1-14)

Here is our Wednesday Night notes from our CBD Sermon- “A Picture of Worship”

I. The Picture of Obedience. (1-11)

A Contrast in Obedience

2 Samuel 6:1–10 (ESV)
1 David again gathered all the chosen men of Israel, thirty thousand. 2 And David arose and went with all the people who were with him from Baale-judah to bring up from there the ark of God, which is called by the name of the LORD of hosts who sits enthroned on the cherubim. 3 And they carried the ark of God on a new cart and brought it out of the house of Abinadab, which was on the hill. And Uzzah and Ahio, the sons of Abinadab, were driving the new cart, 4 with the ark of God, and Ahio went before the ark. 5 And David and all the house of Israel were celebrating before the LORD, with songs and lyres and harps and tambourines and castanets and cymbals. 6 And when they came to the threshing floor of Nacon, Uzzah put out his hand to the ark of God and took hold of it, for the oxen stumbled. 7 And the anger of the LORD was kindled against Uzzah, and God struck him down there because of his error, and he died there beside the ark of God. 8 And David was angry because the LORD had broken out against Uzzah. And that place is called Perez-uzzah to this day. 9 And David was afraid of the LORD that day, and he said, “How can the ark of the LORD come to me?” 10 So David was not willing to take the ark of the LORD into the city of David. But David took it aside to the house of Obed-edom the Gittite.

Described as that which bore the name of God Himself, the ark represented the presence of God who dwelled among His people in a special way (cf. Ex. 25:22). As such, it was to be handled with reverence, even in its transportation from place to place. The Law specified that it be carried by Levites who would bear it on their shoulders by means of poles passed through gold rings attached to the ark (Ex. 25:14; cf. Num. 4:15, 20). Even the Levites could not touch the ark or even look in it because of its holiness. Why David overlooked these requirements it is impossible to know, but he and Uzzah and Ahio, two descendants of Abinadab, placed the ark on a cart and proceeded, with great musical celebration, toward Jerusalem.

Walvoord, J. F., Zuck, R. B., & Dallas Theological Seminary. (1983-). The Bible knowledge commentary : An exposition of the scriptures (2 Sa 6:1–5). Wheaton, IL: Victor Books.

II. The Picture of Celebration. (12-13)

Psalm 150 (ESV)
1 Praise the LORD! Praise God in his sanctuary; praise him in his mighty heavens! 2 Praise him for his mighty deeds; praise him according to his excellent greatness! 3 Praise him with trumpet sound; praise him with lute and harp! 4 Praise him with tambourine and dance; praise him with strings and pipe! 5 Praise him with sounding cymbals; praise him with loud clashing cymbals! 6 Let everything that has breath praise the LORD! Praise the LORD!

It was the duty of the priests, who stood on the right and the left of the marble table on which the fat of the sacrifices was laid, at the proper time to blow the blasts on their silver trumpets. There might not be less than two nor more than 120 in this service; the former in accordance with the original institution,4 the latter not to exceed the number at the dedication of the first Temple.5 The priests faced the people, looking eastwards, while the Levites, who crowded the fifteen steps which led from the Court of Israel to that of the Priests, turned westwards to the sanctuary. On a signal given by the president, the priests moved forward to each side of him who struck the cymbals. Immediately the choir of the Levites, accompanied by instrumental music, began the Psalm of the day. It was sustained by not less than twelve voices, with which mingled the delicious treble from selected voices of young sons of the Levites, who, standing by their fathers, might take part in this service alone. The number of instrumental performers was not limited, nor yet confined to the Levites, some of the distinguished families which had intermarried with the priests being admitted to this service.1 The Psalm of the day was always sung in three sections. At the close of each the priests drew three blasts from their silver trumpets, and the people bowed down and worshipped. This closed the morning service.

Edersheim, A. (2003). The Temple, its ministry and services as they were at the time of Jesus Christ. (171–172). Bellingham, WA: Logos Research Systems, Inc.

“Music thus serves as a catalyst to unify the atoms of human individuality. This is especially true of congregational singing. St. Basil, one of the church fathers, once said, ‘Singing is a mighty bond of union, linking people together in a symphony of one song.’

Even more important is the theological aspect of this phenomenon. Paul says: “And do not be drunk with wine, in which is dissipation; but be filled with the Spirit; speaking … singing and … submitting” (Eph. 5:18–21). And we must remember that the Agent of unity in the church is the Holy Spirit. In this epistle to the Ephesians, Paul has already exhorted his readers to “keep the unity of the Spirit in the bond of peace” (4:3). Thus the church that sings together stays together. Just as it is necessary to come together for prayer, so it is imperative that the church gather for psalms, hymns, and spiritual songs. How important, then, is that exhortation not to forsake “the assembling of ourselves together” (Heb. 10:25).

Olford, S. F., & Olford, D. L. (1998). Anointed Expository Preaching (327). Nashville, TN: Broadman & Holman Publishers.

III. The Picture of God’s Glory. (13-14)

2 Chronicles 7:1–3 (ESV)
1 As soon as Solomon finished his prayer, fire came down from heaven and consumed the burnt offering and the sacrifices, and the glory of the LORD filled the temple. 2 And the priests could not enter the house of the LORD, because the glory of the LORD filled the LORD’s house. 3 When all the people of Israel saw the fire come down and the glory of the LORD on the temple, they bowed down with their faces to the ground on the pavement and worshiped and gave thanks to the LORD, saying, “For he is good, for his steadfast love endures forever.”

But how solemn must have been the scene when, at the dedication of Solomon’s Temple during the service of praise, ‘the house was filled with a cloud, even the house of Jehovah; so that the priests could not stand to minister by reason of the cloud: for the glory of Jehovah had filled the house of God!’1 Such music, and such responsive singing, might well serve, in the Book of Revelation, as imagery of heavenly realities,2 especially in that description of the final act of worship in Rev. 14:1–5, where at the close of their antiphony the two choirs combine, as at the dedication of the second Temple, to join in this grand unison, ‘Alleluia: for the Lord God omnipotent reigneth.’

Edersheim, A. (2003). The Temple, its ministry and services as they were at the time of Jesus Christ. (81). Bellingham, WA: Logos Research Systems, Inc.

Revelation 19:1–8 (ESV)
1 After this I heard what seemed to be the loud voice of a great multitude in heaven, crying out, “Hallelujah! Salvation and glory and power belong to our God, 2 for his judgments are true and just; for he has judged the great prostitute who corrupted the earth with her immorality, and has avenged on her the blood of his servants.” 3 Once more they cried out, “Hallelujah! The smoke from her goes up forever and ever.” 4 And the twenty-four elders and the four living creatures fell down and worshiped God who was seated on the throne, saying, “Amen. Hallelujah!” 5 And from the throne came a voice saying, “Praise our God, all you his servants, you who fear him, small and great.” 6 Then I heard what seemed to be the voice of a great multitude, like the roar of many waters and like the sound of mighty peals of thunder, crying out, “Hallelujah! For the Lord our God the Almighty reigns. 7 Let us rejoice and exult and give him the glory, for the marriage of the Lamb has come, and his Bride has made herself ready; 8 it was granted her to clothe herself with fine linen, bright and pure”— for the fine linen is the righteous deeds of the saints.
Elements of True Worship:

1. Obedience is foundational for True Worship.

2. Celebration is a part of True Worship. (Hbrw-praise-to be boastful, to shout in both joy and terror.)

3. Unity is essential for True Worship.

You see, when we separate people according to something as trivial as musical preferences, we evidence a fundamental failure to comprehend the heart of the gospel. We’re not only feeding toxic tribalism; we’re also saying the gospel can’t successfully bring these two different groups together. It’s a declaration of doubt about the unifying power of God’s gospel. Generational appeal in worship is an admission that the gospel is powerless to join together what man has separated.

Building the church on stylistic preferences or age appeal (whether old or young) is just as contrary to the reconciling effect of the gospel as building it on class, race, or gender distinctions. In a recent interview J. I. Packer said, “If worship services are so fixed that what’s being offered fits the expectations, the hopes, even the prejudices, of any one of these groups as opposed to the others, I don’t believe the worship style glorifies God.” One of the leading ways the church can testify to God’s unifying power before our segregated world is to establish and maintain congregations and worship services that transcend cultural barriers, including age and musical styles.

4. Participation is mandatory for True Worship. (Worship is not about you, it is about God and His glory)

Prayer

“God thank you for the privilege of worship, thank you for the reconciled relationship we have through Jesus Christ. God give the grace to set our minds attention and hearts affection on you, for who you are, and what you have done through Jesus. I repent of making worship about anything other than you and your Son. In Christ name, amen”

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About George Ross

I am a pastor, church planter, husband, and father of four.
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